Walmart settles for $14 million in case vs former workers who claimed discrimination due to pregnancy

October 20, 2019

Earlier this month, Walmart agreed to a $14 million settlement, after a legal battle with an Illinois Class of formerly pregnant and pregnant employees who claimed Walmart's policies on disability accommodations discriminated against them.

 

According to paperwork, plaintiffs Otisha Woolbright and Talisa Borders alleged that the store used a three-tier disability policy with employees who sustained injuries on the job, pregnant employees, and employees with other disabilities received different treatment.

 

Before a 2014 change in Walmart's disability accommodation policy the plaintiffs claimed that the superstore chain would only allow accommodations to typical work duties for workers whose condition arose from injuries on the job. As a result, simple accommodations such as not climbing ladders or not lifting 25 lb+ items were not automatically given to women who were pregnant. In her claim, Ms. Borders alleged that after she asked for these accommodations she was instead offered an unpaid leave of absence. She claimed that after her unpaid leave and following the birth of her child she returned to her job, but was demoted and her pay was cut.

 

Ms. Woolbright filed a similar charge with the EEOC claiming Walmart had discriminated against her because of her pregnancy as well. Additionally, both charges filed by the plaintiffs contained facts of retaliation by Walmart.

 

At the law offices of T. Verner Smith, we represent clients who have been the victims of discrimination. These types of lawsuits not only provide necessary compensation for those who were wrongfully treated, but also creates an environment of caution leading to better quality of life for all. Contact us for a free consultation at (731) 423-1888, (901) 730-4567, or (615) 371-6136.

 

 

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